How Your Root Canal Can Make You Sick

By David Blyweiss, M.D., Advanced Natural Wellness

November 4, 2015

  • Do you have dead teeth in your mouth?
  • How root canals can make you sick
  • The best choice for dental implants

When you have a tooth that’s decayed or infected, dentists are quick to send you off for a root canal. If you’ve never had one before, it’s a procedure where the nerve and pulp are removed from the inside of your tooth. Then, the tooth is cleaned and sealed.

Here’s the problem: Once a tooth has been through a root canal, the tooth is dead. And you have to ask the question “What is my body going to do with a dead tooth?”

Well, it’s going to want to reject it, just like it would with any other dead organ or tissue.

You see, no medical doctor would ever leave a dead organ in your body.

They wouldn’t fail to remove tissue or perform an amputation if you suffered from a putrid infection or gangrene. You would die.

But, for some reason, dentistry hasn’t yet caught up to modern medical practices. So a lot of folks are walking around with dead teeth in their mouths.

If you’re one of them, you need to take notice.

A tooth that’s gone through a root canal sets the stage for infection and cell death in surrounding tissue. These events throw your body into a state of chronic inflammation.

Bacteria start building up, and this adds to the problem. That’s because once the pulp is removed from a tooth, so is the blood supply. Without that blood supply, bacteria and toxins can’t be naturally removed from dentinal tubules. It just continues to build up inside the tooth.

Still, all of that toxic waste tends to leak out of the tubules.

For example, after a root canal, every time you bite down bacteria are flushed into your blood stream. A lot of it takes up residence in the bone surrounding the dead tooth. The rest of it wanders through your body searching for a new home – in your heart, nervous system, brain, kidneys and other organs – where it can do the most damage.

So you can see the dilemma.

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Yet, dentists have convinced us that we can keep dead teeth in our mouths without any negative consequences. And they couldn’t be more wrong. The inflammation and oral bacteria from a root canal set the stage for heart disease, stroke, diabetes…even pneumonia.

Now, I have several patients who have paid for expensive root canals, only to find themselves suffering from “unexplained symptoms” like fatigue and lethargy.

Others find themselves with a “failed” root canal, experiencing recurrent infections (and hefty doses of antibiotics) on a bi-monthly basis.

In most cases, they end up getting the tooth pulled, then paying for another costly procedure…a tooth implant.

My recommendation is to skip the root canal altogether, and go straight for an implant.

Not only will you end up spending less money, you’ll also bypass all of those nasty side-effects and inflammatory factors that come with a root canal.

However, don’t go for a standard titanium implant. Some people are allergic to this metal, which can result in implant failure. Plus, it throws off corrosion.

Instead, opt for the newer zirconia dental implant.

I like these better, because they use a high-impact ceramic that’s much more compatible with your body and oral environment. I especially like the fact that they’re tissue friendly, have a very low allergic potential and retain less plaque than titanium.

All of these advantages bode well for a healthier mouth and wholesome body.

Sources:

Li X, et al. Systemic diseases caused by oral infection. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2000 Oct;13(4):547-58.

Sicilia A, et al. Titanium allergy in dental implant patients: a clinical study on 1500 consecutive patients. Clin Oral Implants Res. 2008 Aug;19(8):823-35.

Borgonovo, AE, et al. Evaluation of the Success Criteria for Zirconia Dental Implants: A Four-Year Clinical and Radiological Study. Int J Dent. 2013; 2013: 463073.

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